Remote execution in mgmt

Bootstrapping a cluster from your laptop, or managing machines without needing to first setup a separate config management infrastructure are both very reasonable and fundamental asks. I was particularly inspired by Ansible‘s agent-less remote execution model, but never wanted to build a centralized orchestrator. I soon realized that I could have my ice cream and eat it too.

Prior knowledge

If you haven’t read the earlier articles about mgmt, then I recommend you start with those, and then come back here. The first and fourth are essential if you’re going to make sense of this article.

Limitations of existing orchestrators

Current orchestrators have a few limitations.

  1. They can be a single point of failure
  2. They can have scaling issues
  3. They can’t respond instantaneously to node state changes (they poll)
  4. They can’t usually redistribute remote node run-time data between nodes

Despite these limitations, orchestration is still very useful because of the facilities it provides. Since these facilities are essential in a next generation design, I set about integrating these features, but with a novel twist.

Implementation, Usage and Design

Mgmt is written in golang, and that decision was no accident. One benefit is that it simplifies our remote execution model.

To use this mode you run mgmt with the --remote flag. Each use of the --remote argument points to a different remote graph to execute. Eventually this will be integrated with the DSL, but this plumbing is exposed for early adopters to play around with.

Startup (part one)

Each invocation of --remote causes mgmt to remotely connect over SSH to the target hosts. This happens in parallel, and runs up to --cconns simultaneous connections.

A temporary directory is made on the remote host, and the mgmt binary and graph are copied across the wire. Since mgmt compiles down to a single statically compiled binary, it simplifies the transfer of the software. The binary is cached remotely to speed up future runs unless you pass the --no-caching option.

A TCP connection is tunnelled back over SSH to the originating hosts etcd server which is embedded and running inside of the initiating mgmt binary.

Execution (part two)

The remote mgmt binary is now run! It wires itself up through the SSH tunnel so that its internal etcd client can connect to the etcd server on the initiating host. This is particularly powerful because remote hosts can now participate in resource exchanges as if they were part of a regular etcd backed mgmt cluster! They don’t connect directly to each other, but they can share runtime data, and only need an incoming SSH port open!

Closure (part three)

At this point mgmt can either keep running continuously or it can close the connections and shutdown.

In the former case, you can either remain attached over SSH, or you can disconnect from the child hosts and let this new cluster take on a new life and operate independently of the initiator.

In the latter case you can either shutdown at the operators request (via a ^C on the initiator) or when the cluster has simultaneously converged for a number of seconds.

This second possibility occurs when you run mgmt with the familiar --converged-timeout parameter. It is indeed clever enough to also work in this distributed fashion.


I’ve used by poor libreoffice draw skills to make a diagram. Hopefully this helps out my visual readers.


If you can improve this diagram, please let me know!


I find that using one or more vagrant virtual machines for the remote endpoints is the best way to test this out. In my case I use Oh-My-Vagrant to set up these machines, but the method you use is entirely up to you! Here’s a sample remote execution. Please note that I have omitted a number of lines for brevity, and added emphasis to the more interesting ones.

james@hostname:~/code/mgmt$ ./mgmt run --remote examples/remote2a.yaml --remote examples/remote2b.yaml --tmp-prefix 
17:58:22 main.go:76: This is: mgmt, version: 0.0.5-3-g4b8ad3a
17:58:23 remote.go:596: Remote: Connect...
17:58:23 remote.go:607: Remote: Sftp...
17:58:23 remote.go:164: Remote: Self executable is: /home/james/code/gopath/src/
17:58:23 remote.go:221: Remote: Remotely created: /tmp/mgmt-412078160/remote
17:58:23 remote.go:226: Remote: Remote path is: /tmp/mgmt-412078160/remote/mgmt
17:58:23 remote.go:221: Remote: Remotely created: /tmp/mgmt-412078160/remote
17:58:23 remote.go:226: Remote: Remote path is: /tmp/mgmt-412078160/remote/mgmt
17:58:23 remote.go:235: Remote: Copying binary, please be patient...
17:58:23 remote.go:235: Remote: Copying binary, please be patient...
17:58:24 remote.go:256: Remote: Copying graph definition...
17:58:24 remote.go:618: Remote: Tunnelling...
17:58:24 remote.go:630: Remote: Exec...
17:58:24 remote.go:510: Remote: Running: /tmp/mgmt-412078160/remote/mgmt run --hostname '' --no-server --seeds '' --file '/tmp/mgmt-412078160/remote/remote2a.yaml' --depth 1
17:58:24 etcd.go:2088: Etcd: Watch: Path: /_mgmt/exported/
17:58:24 main.go:255: Main: Waiting...
17:58:24 remote.go:256: Remote: Copying graph definition...
17:58:24 remote.go:618: Remote: Tunnelling...
17:58:24 remote.go:630: Remote: Exec...
17:58:24 remote.go:510: Remote: Running: /tmp/mgmt-412078160/remote/mgmt run --hostname '' --no-server --seeds '' --file '/tmp/mgmt-412078160/remote/remote2b.yaml' --depth 1
17:58:24 etcd.go:2088: Etcd: Watch: Path: /_mgmt/exported/
17:58:24 main.go:291: Config: Parse failure
17:58:24 main.go:255: Main: Waiting...
^C17:58:48 main.go:62: Interrupted by ^C
17:58:48 main.go:397: Destroy...
17:58:48 remote.go:532: Remote: Output...
|    17:58:23 main.go:76: This is: mgmt, version: 0.0.5-3-g4b8ad3a
|    17:58:47 main.go:419: Goodbye!
17:58:48 remote.go:636: Remote: Done!
17:58:48 remote.go:532: Remote: Output...
|    17:58:24 main.go:76: This is: mgmt, version: 0.0.5-3-g4b8ad3a
|    17:58:48 main.go:419: Goodbye!
17:58:48 remote.go:636: Remote: Done!
17:58:48 main.go:419: Goodbye!

You should see that we kick off the remote executions, and how they are wired back through the tunnel. In this particular case we terminated the runs with a ^C.

The example configurations I used are available here and here. If you had a terminal open on the first remote machine, after about a second you would have seen:

[root@omv1 ~]# ls -d /tmp/file*  /tmp/mgmt*
/tmp/file1a  /tmp/file2a  /tmp/file2b  /tmp/mgmt-412078160
[root@omv1 ~]# cat /tmp/file*
i am file1a
i am file2a, exported from host a
i am file2b, exported from host b

You can see the remote execution artifacts, and that there was clearly data exchange. You can repeat this example with --converged-timeout=5 to automatically terminate after five seconds of cluster wide inactivity.

Live remote hacking

Since mgmt is event based, and graph structure configurations manifest themselves as event streams, you can actually edit the input configuration on the initiating machine, and as soon as the file is saved, it will instantly remotely propagate and apply the graph differential.

For this particular example, since we export and collect resources through the tunnelled SSH connections, it means editing the exported file, will also cause both hosts to update that file on disk!

You’ll see this occurring with this message in the logs:

18:00:44 remote.go:973: Remote: Copied over new graph definition: examples/remote2b.yaml

While you might not necessarily want to use this functionality on a production machine, it will definitely make your interactive hacking sessions more useful, in particular because you never need to re-run parts of the graph which have already converged!


In case you’re wondering, mgmt can look in your ~/.ssh/ for keys to use for the auth, or it can prompt you interactively. It can also read a plain text password from the connection string, but this isn’t a recommended security practice.

Hierarchial remote execution

Even though we recommend running mgmt in a normal clustered mode instead of over SSH, we didn’t want to limit the number of hosts that can be configured using remote execution. For this reason it would be architecturally simple to add support for what we’ve decided to call “hierarchial remote execution”.

In this mode, the primary initiator would first connect to one or more secondary nodes, which would then stage a second series of remote execution runs resulting in an order of depth equal to two or more. This fan out approach can be used to distribute the number of outgoing connections across more intermediate machines, or as a method to conserve remote execution bandwidth on the primary link into your datacenter, by having the secondary machine run most of the remote execution runs.


This particular extension hasn’t been built, although some of the plumbing has been laid. If you’d like to contribute this feature to the upstream project, please join us in #mgmtconfig on Freenode and let us (I’m @purpleidea) know!


There is some generated documentation for the mgmt remote package available. There is also the beginning of some additional documentation in the markdown docs. You can help contribute to either of these by sending us a patch!

Novel resources

Our event based architecture can enable some previously improbable kinds of resources. In particular, I think it would be quite beautiful if someone built a provisioning resource. The Watch method of the resource API normally serves to notify us of events, but since it is a main loop that blocks in a select call, it could also be used to run a small server that hosts a kickstart file and associated TFTP images. If you like this idea, please help us build it!


I hope you enjoyed this article and found this remote execution methodology as novel as we do. In particular I hope that I’ve demonstrated that configuration software doesn’t have to be constrained behind a static orchestration topology.

Happy Hacking,


mgmt has a logo

The mgmt config project got a logo! The full commit is here. Thanks to Sarah Jane Cox for creating it.


Happy Hacking,


PS: I might have a few stickers to give out too! Ask me next time you see me if you’d like one! Alternatively, use the artwork to make your own and share with your friends!

Live dmesg following

All good sysadmins eventually learn about using tail -F to tail files. Yes upper-case F is superior.

Around the time I wrote that article, I remember wanting to stream dmesg output too! The functionality wasn’t available without some sort of polling hack, but it turns out that kernel support for this actually landed around the same time in version 3.5.0!

Most GNU/Linux distros are probably running a new enough version by now, and you can now dmesg --follow (or dmesg -w):

$ dmesg -w
[1042958.877980] restoring control 00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000101/10/5
[1042959.254826] usb 1-1.2: reset low-speed USB device number 3 using ehci-pci
[1042959.356847] psmouse serio1: synaptics: queried max coordinates: x [..5472], y [..4448]
[1042959.530884] PM: resume of devices complete after 976.885 msecs
[1042959.531457] PM: Finishing wakeup.
[1042959.531460] Restarting tasks ... done.
[1042959.622234] video LNXVIDEO:00: Restoring backlight state
[1042959.767952] e1000e: enp0s25 NIC Link is Down
[1042959.771333] IPv6: ADDRCONF(NETDEV_UP): enp0s25: link is not ready
[1048528.391506] All your base are belong to us.

As an added bonus, you can access this via journalctl --dmesg --follow too:

$ journalctl -kf
Aug 28 19:58:13 hostname unknown: All your base are belong to us.
Now we have a dmesg version too!

Now we have a dmesg version too!

Since my dmesg output wasn’t very noisy when writing this article, and since I didn’t write an “all your base” kernel module, you can actually test this functionality by writing to the kernel ring buffer:

$ sudo bash -c 'echo The Technical Blog of James is awesome! > /dev/kmsg'

Happy hacking!


PS: Since this is a facility that provides events, we could eventually write an mgmt config “fact” or resource around it!

Seen in downtown Montreal…

The Technical Blog of James was seen on an outdoor electronic display in downtown Montreal! Thanks to one of my readers for sending this in.

I guess the smart phone revolution is over, and people are taking to reading my articles on bigger screens!

I guess the smart phone revolution is over, and people are taking to reading my articles on bigger screens! The “poutine” is decent proof that this is probably Montreal.

If you’ve got access to a large electronic display, put up the blog, snap a photo, and send it my way! I’ll post it here and send you some random stickers!

Happy Hacking,


PS: If you have some comments about this blog, please don’t be shy, send them my way.

Ten minute hacks: Hacking airplane headphones

I was stuck on a 14 hour flight last week, and to my disappointment, only one of the two headphone speakers were working. The plane’s media centre has an audio connector that looks like this:


Someone should consider probing this USB port.

The hole to the left is smaller than a 3.5mm headphone jack, and designed for a proprietary headphone connector that I didn’t have, and the two holes to the right are part of a different proprietary connector which match with the cheap airline headphones to provide the left and right audio channels.


Completely reversible, and therefore completely ambiguous. Stereo is so 1880’s anyways.

By reversing the connector, I was quickly able to determine that the headphones were not faulty, because this swapped the missing audio channel to the other ear. It’s also immediately obvious that since there are no left vs. right polarity markings on either the receptacle or the headphones, there’s a 50% chance that you’ll get reverse stereo.

With the fault identified, and lots of time to kill, I decided to try to hack a workaround. I borrowed some tweezers from a nearby passenger, and slowly ripped off some of the exterior plastic to expose the signal wires. To my surprise there were actually four wires, instead of three using a shared ground.


Headphone wires stripped, exposed and ready for splicing.

With a bit of care this only took about five minutes. The next step was to “patch” the working positive and ground wires from the working channel, into the speaker from the broken channel. I did this by trial and error using a bit of intuition to try to keep both speakers in phase.


After a twist splice and using paper as an insulator.

A small scrap of paper acted as an insulator to prevent short circuits between the positive and negative wires. Lastly, a figure eight on a bight was tied to isolate the weak splice from any tension, thus preventing damage and disconnects.


All wrapped up neatly and tied with a knot.

The finished product worked beautifully, despite now only providing monaural audio and is about five centimetres shorter, which is still perfectly usable since the seats hardly recline. The flight staff weren’t angry that I had cannibalized their headphones, but also didn’t understand how my contraption was able to solve the problem.

This fun little ten minute hack helped provide some distraction in economy class, and maybe it will be useful to you since I doubt they’ve repaired the media system in the seat! If you work for Emirates, let me know and I’ll give you the seat and flight number.

Happy hacking!


Automatic clustering in mgmt

In mgmt, deploying and managing your clustered config management infrastructure needs to be as automatic as the infrastructure you’re using mgmt to manage. With mgmt, instead of a centralized data store, we function as a distributed system, built on top of etcd and the raft protocol.

In this article, I’ll cover how this feature works.


Mgmt is a next generation configuration management project. If you haven’t heard of it yet, or you don’t remember why we use a distributed database, start by reading the previous articles:

Embedded etcd:

Since mgmt and etcd are both written in golang, the etcd code can be built into the same binary as mgmt. As a result, etcd can be managed directly from within mgmt. Unfortunately, there’s currently no recommended API to do this, but I’ve tried to get such a feature upstream to avoid code duplication in mgmt. If you can help out here, I’d really appreciate it! In the meantime, I’ve had to copy+paste the necessary portions into mgmt.

Clustering mechanics:

You can deploy an automatically clustered mgmt cluster by following these three steps:

1) If no mgmt servers exist you can start one up by running mgmt normally:

./mgmt run --file examples/graph0.yaml

2) To add any subsequent mgmt server, run mgmt normally, but point it at any number of existing mgmt servers with the --seeds command:

./mgmt run --file examples/graph0.yaml --seeds <ip address:port>

3) Profit!

We internally implement a clustering algorithm which does the hard-working of building and managing the etcd cluster for you, so that you don’t have to. If you’re interested, keep reading to find out how it works!

Clustering algorithm:

The clustering algorithm works as follows:

If you aren’t given any seeds, then assume you are the first etcd server (peer) and start-up. If you are given a seeds argument, then connect to that peer to join the cluster as a client. If you’d like to be promoted to a server, then you can “volunteer” by setting a special key in the cluster data store.

The existing cluster of peers will decide if they want additional peers, and if so, they can “nominate” someone from the pool of volunteers. If you have been nominated, you can start-up an etcd peer and peer with the rest of the cluster. Similarly, the cluster can decide to un-nominate a peer, and if you’ve been un-nominated, then you should shutdown your etcd server.

All cluster decisions are made by consensus using the raft algorithm. In practice this means that the elected cluster leader looks at the state of the system, and makes the necessary nomination changes.

Lastly, if you don’t want to be a peer any more, you can revoke your volunteer message, which will be seen by the cluster, and if you were running a server, you should receive an un-nominate message in response, which will let you shutdown cleanly.


It’s probably worth mentioning that the current implementation has a few issues, and at least one race. The goal is to have it polished up by the time etcd v3 is released, but it’s perfectly usable for testing and experimentation today! If you don’t want to automatically cluster, you can always use the --no-server flag, and point mgmt at a manually managed mgmt cluster using the --seeds flag.


Testing this feature on a single machine makes development and experimentation easier, so as a result, there are a few flags which make this possible.

--hostname <hostname>
With this flag, you can force your mgmt client to pretend it is running on a host with the above mentioned name. You can use this to specify --hostname h1, or --hostname h2, and so on; one for each mgmt agent you want to run on the same machine.

--server-urls <ip:port>
With this flag you can specify which IP address and port the etcd server will listen on for peer requests. By default this will use, but when running multiple mgmt agents on the same machine you’ll need to specify this manually to avoid collisions. You can specify as many IP address and port pairs as you’d like by separating them with commas or semicolons. The --peer-urls flag is an alias which does the same thing.

--client-urls <ip:port>
This flag specifies which IP address and port the etcd server will listen on for client connections. It defaults to, but you’ll occasionally want to specify this manually for the same reasons as mentioned above. You can specify as many IP address and port pairs as you’d like by separating them with commas or semicolons. This is the address that will be used by the --seeds flag when joining an existing cluster.

Elastic clustering:

In the future, you’ll be able to specify a much more elaborate method to decide how many hosts should be promoted into peers, and which hosts should be nominated or un-nominated when growing or shrinking the cluster.

At the moment, we do the grow or shrink operation when the current peer count does not match the requested cluster size. This value has a default of 5, and can even be changed dynamically. To do so you can run:

ETCDCTL_API=3 etcdctl --endpoints put /_mgmt/idealClusterSize 3

You can also set it at start-up by using the --ideal-cluster-size flag.


Here’s a real example if you want to dive in. Try running the following four commands in separate terminals:

./mgmt run --file examples/etcd1a.yaml --hostname h1 --ideal-cluster-size 3
./mgmt run --file examples/etcd1b.yaml --hostname h2 --seeds --client-urls --server-urls
./mgmt run --file examples/etcd1c.yaml --hostname h3 --seeds --client-urls --server-urls
./mgmt run --file examples/etcd1d.yaml --hostname h4 --seeds --client-urls --server-urls

Once you’ve done this, you should have a three host cluster! Check this by running any of these commands:

ETCDCTL_API=3 etcdctl --endpoints member list
ETCDCTL_API=3 etcdctl --endpoints member list
ETCDCTL_API=3 etcdctl --endpoints member list

Note that you’ll need a v3 beta version of the etcdctl command which you can get by running ./build in the etcd git repo.

To grow your cluster, try increasing the desired cluster size to five:

ETCDCTL_API=3 etcdctl --endpoints put /_mgmt/idealClusterSize 5

You should see the last host start-up an etcd server. If you reduce the idealClusterSize, you’ll see servers shutdown! You’re responsible if you destroy the cluster by setting it too low! You can then try growing your cluster again, but unfortunately due to a bug, hosts can’t be re-used yet, and you’ll get a “bind: address already in use” error. We hope to have this fixed shortly!


Unfortunately no authentication security or transport security has been implemented yet. We have a great design, but are busy working on other parts of the project at the moment. If you’d like to help out here, please let us know!

Future work:

There’s still a lot of work to do, to improve this feature. The biggest challenge has been getting a reasonable embedded server API upstream. It’s not clear whether this patch can be made to work or if something different will need to be written, but at least one other project looks like it could benefit from this as well.


A recording from the recent Berlin CoreOSFest 2016 has been published! I demoed these recent features, but one interesting note is that I am actually presenting an earlier version of the code which used the etcd V2 API. I’ve since ported the code to V3, but it is functionally similar. It’s probably worth mentioning, that I found the V3 API to be more difficult, but also more correct and powerful. I think it is a net improvement to the project.


I can’t end this blog post without mentioning some of the great stuff that’s been happening in the mgmt community! In particular, Felix has written some great code to run existing Puppet code on mgmt. Check out his work!

Upcoming speaking:

I’ve got some upcoming speaking in Hong Kong at HKOSCon16 and in Cape Town at DebConf16 about the project. Please ping me if you’ll be in one of these cities and would like to hack on mgmt or just chat about the project. I’m happy to give some impromptu demos if you ask!

Thanks for reading!

Happy Hacking,


PS: We now have a community run twitter account. Check us out!

Upcoming speaking In Hong Kong and South Africa

I’m thrilled to tell you that I’ll be speaking about mgmt in Hong Kong and South Africa. It will be my first time to both countries and my first time to Asia and Africa!

In Hong Kong I’ll be speaking at HKOSCon2016.

In South Africa I’ll be speaking at DebConf16.

I’m looking forward to meeting with many of the hard-working Debian hackers, and collaborating with them to build and promote excellent Free Software. The mgmt project considers both Fedora and Debian to be first class platforms, and parity is a primary design goal.

I’ll be presenting and demoing many of the new features in mgmt. If you haven’t heard about the project, please read some of the posts about it…

You’re also welcome to come join our IRC channel! It’s #mgmtconfig on Freenode.

Many special thanks to both conference organizers as well as Red Hat and the OSAS department for sponsoring my travel! Without it, visiting these places and interacting with new continents of hackers would be impossible.

Happy Hacking,


PS: We now have a community run twitter account. Check us out!