The switch as an ordinary GNU/Linux server

The fact that we manage the switches in our data centres differently than any other server is patently absurd, but we do so because we want to harness the power of a tiny bit of silicon which happens to be able to dramatically speed up the switching bandwidth.

absurd

beware of proprietary silicon, it’s absurd!

That tiny bit of silicon is known as an ASIC, or an application specific integrated circuit, and one particularly well performing ASIC (which is present in many commercially available switches) is called the Trident.

None of this should impact the end-user management experience, however, because the big switch companies and chip makers believe that there is some special differentiation in their IP, they’ve ensured that the stacks and software surrounding the hardware is highly proprietary and difficult to replace. This also lets them create and sell bundled products and features that you don’t want, but which you can’t get elsewhere.

This is still true today! System and network engineers know too well the hassles of dealing with the different proprietary switch operating systems and interfaces. Why not standardize on the well-known interface that every GNU/Linux server uses.

We’re talking about iptables of course! (Although nftables would be an acceptable standard too!) This way we could have a common interface for all the networked devices in our server room.

I’ve been able to work around this limitation in the past, by using Linux to do my routing in software, and by building the routers out of COTS 2U GNU/Linux boxes. The trouble with this approach, is that they’re bigger, louder, more expensive, consume more power, and don’t have the port density that a 48 port 1U switch does.

a 48 port, 1U switch

a 48 port, 1U switch

It turns out that there is a company which is actually trying to build this mythical box. It is not perfect, but I think they are on the right track. What follows are my opinions of what they’ve done right, what’s wrong, and what I’d like to see in the future.

Who are they?

They are Cumulus Networks, and I recently got to meet, demo and discuss with one of their very talented engineers, Leslie Carr. I recently attended a talk that she gave on this very same subject. She gave me a rocket turtle. (Yes, this now makes me biased!)

my rocket turtle, the cumulus networks mascot

my rocket turtle, the cumulus networks mascot

What are they doing?

You buy an existing switch from your favourite vendor. You then throw out (flash over) the included software, and instead, pay them a yearly licensing fee to use the “Cumulus” GNU/Linux. It comes as an OS image, based off of Debian.

How does it talk to the ASIC?

The OS image comes with a daemon called switchd that transfers the kernel iptables rules down into the ASIC. I don’t know the specifics on how this works exactly because:

  1. Switchd is proprietary. Apparently this is because of a scary NDA they had to sign, but it’s still unfortunate, and it is impeding my hacking.
  2. I’m not an expert on talking to ASIC’s. I’m guessing that unless you’ve signed the NDA’s, and you’re behind the Trident paywall, then it’s tough to become one!

Problems with packaging:

The OS is only distributed as a single image. This is an unfortunate mistake! It should be available from the upstream project with switchd (and any other add-ons) as individual .deb packages. That way, I know I’m getting a stock OS which is preferably even built and signed by the Debian team! That way I could use the same infrastructure for my servers to keep all my servers up to date.

Problems with OS security:

Unfortunately the OS doesn’t benefit from any of the standard OS security enhancements like SELinux. I’d prefer running a more advanced distro like RHEL or CentOS that have these things out of the box, but if Cumulus will continue using Debian, then they must include some more advanced security measures. I didn’t find AppArmor or grsecurity in use either. It did seem to have all the important bash security updates:

cumulus@switch1$ bash --version
GNU bash, version 4.2.37(1)-release (powerpc-unknown-linux-gnu)
Copyright (C) 2011 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later 

This is free software; you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.

Use of udev:

This switch does seem to support and use udev, although not being a udev expert I can’t comment on if it’s done properly or not. I’d be interested to hear from the pros. Here’s what I found:

cumulus@switch1$ cd /etc/udev/
cumulus@switch1$ tree
.
`-- rules.d
    |-- 10-cumulus.rules
    |-- 60-bridge-network-interface.rules -> /dev/null
    |-- 75-persistent-net-generator.rules -> /dev/null
    `-- 80-networking.rules -> /dev/null

1 directory, 4 files
cumulus@switch1$ cat rules.d/10-cumulus.rules | tail -n 7
# udev rules specific to Cumulus Linux

# Rule called when the linux-user-bde driver is loaded
ACTION=="add" SUBSYSTEM=="module" DEVPATH=="/module/linux_user_bde" ENV{DEVICE_NAME}="linux-user-bde" ENV{DEVICE_TYPE}="c" ENV{DEVICE_MINOR}="0" RUN="/usr/lib/cumulus/udev-module"

# Quanta LY8 uses RTC1
KERNEL=="rtc1", PROGRAM="/usr/bin/platform-detect", RESULT=="quanta,ly8_rangeley", SYMLINK+="rtc"

Other things:

There seems to be a number of extra things running on the switch. Here’s what I mean:

cumulus@switch1$ ps auxwww 
USER       PID %CPU %MEM    VSZ   RSS TTY      STAT START   TIME COMMAND
root         1  0.0  0.0   2516   860 ?        Ss   Nov05   0:02 init [3]  
root         2  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:00 [kthreadd]
root         3  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:05 [ksoftirqd/0]
root         5  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:00 [kworker/u:0]
root         6  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:00 [migration/0]
root         7  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S<   Nov05   0:00 [cpuset]
root         8  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S<   Nov05   0:00 [khelper]
root         9  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S<   Nov05   0:00 [netns]
root        10  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:02 [sync_supers]
root        11  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:00 [bdi-default]
root        12  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S<   Nov05   0:00 [kblockd]
root        13  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S<   Nov05   0:00 [ata_sff]
root        14  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:00 [khubd]
root        15  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S<   Nov05   0:00 [rpciod]
root        17  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:00 [khungtaskd]
root        18  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:00 [kswapd0]
root        19  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:00 [fsnotify_mark]
root        20  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S<   Nov05   0:00 [nfsiod]
root        21  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S<   Nov05   0:00 [crypto]
root        34  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:00 [scsi_eh_0]
root        36  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:00 [kworker/u:2]
root        41  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:00 [mtdblock0]
root        42  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:00 [mtdblock1]
root        43  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:00 [mtdblock2]
root        44  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:00 [mtdblock3]
root        49  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:00 [mtdblock4]
root       362  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:54 [hwmon0]
root       363  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   1:01 [hwmon1]
root       398  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    Nov05   0:04 [flush-8:0]
root       862  0.0  0.1  28680  1768 ?        Sl   Nov05   0:03 /usr/sbin/rsyslogd -c4
root      1041  0.0  0.2   5108  2420 ?        Ss   Nov05   0:00 /sbin/dhclient -pf /run/dhclient.eth0.pid -lf /var/lib/dhcp/dhclient.eth0.leases eth0
root      1096  0.0  0.1   3344  1552 ?        S    Nov05   0:16 /bin/bash /usr/bin/arp_refresh
root      1188  0.0  1.1  15456 10676 ?        S    Nov05   1:36 /usr/bin/python /usr/sbin/ledmgrd
root      1218  0.2  1.1  15468 10708 ?        S    Nov05   5:41 /usr/bin/python /usr/sbin/pwmd
root      1248  1.4  1.1  15480 10728 ?        S    Nov05  39:45 /usr/bin/python /usr/sbin/smond
root      1289  0.0  0.0  13832   964 ?        SNov05   0:00 /sbin/auditd
root      1291  0.0  0.0  10456   852 ?        S
root     12776  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    04:31   0:01 [kworker/0:0]
root     13606  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    05:05   0:00 [kworker/0:2]
root     13892  0.0  0.0      0     0 ?        S    05:13   0:00 [kworker/0:1]
root     13999  0.0  0.0   2028   512 ?        S    05:16   0:00 sleep 30
cumulus  14016  0.0  0.1   3324  1128 pts/0    R+   05:17   0:00 ps auxwww
root     30713 15.6  2.4  69324 24176 ?        Ssl  Nov05 304:16 /usr/sbin/switchd -d
root     30952  0.0  0.3  11196  3500 ?        Ss   Nov05   0:00 sshd: cumulus [priv]
cumulus  30954  0.0  0.1  11196  1684 ?        S    Nov05   0:00 sshd: cumulus@pts/0
cumulus  30955  0.0  0.2   4548  2888 pts/0    Ss   Nov05   0:01 -bash

In particular, I’m referring to ledmgrd, pwmd, smond and others. I don’t doubt these things are necessary and useful, in fact, they’re written in python and should be easy to reverse if anyone is interested, but if they’re a useful part of a switch capable operating system, I hope that they grow proper upstream projects and get appropriate documentation, licensing, and packaging too!

Switch ports are network devices:

Hacking on the device couldn’t feel more native. Anyone remember how to enumerate the switch ports on IOS? … Who cares! Try the standard iproute2 tools on a Cumulus box:

cumulus@switch1$ ip a s swp42
44: swp42: <broadcast,multicast> mtu 1500 qdisc noop state DOWN qlen 500
    link/ether 08:9e:01:f8:96:74 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
cumulus@switch1$ ip a | grep swp | wc -l
52

What about ifup/ifdown?

This one is a bit different:

cumulus@switch1$ file /sbin/ifup
/sbin/ifup: symbolic link to `/sbin/ifupdown'
cumulus@switch1$ file /sbin/ifupdown 
/sbin/ifupdown: Python script, ASCII text executable

The Cumulus team encountered issues with the traditional ifup/ifdown tools found in a stock distro. So they replaced them, with shiny python versions:

https://github.com/CumulusNetworks/ifupdown2

I hope that this project either gets into the upstream distro, or that some upstream writes tools that address the limitations in the various messes of shell scripts. I’m optimistic about networkd being the solution here, but until that’s fully baked, the Cumulus team has built a nice workaround. Additionally, until the Debian team finalizes on the proper technical decision to use SystemD, it has a bleak future.

Kernel:

All the kernel hackers out there will want to know what’s under the hood:

cumulus@switch1$ uname -a
Linux leaf1 3.2.46-1+deb7u1+cl2.2+1 #3.2.46-1+deb7u1+cl2.2+1 SMP Thu Oct 16 14:28:31 PDT 2014 ppc powerpc GNU/Linux

Because this is an embedded chip found in a 1U box, and not an Xeon processor, it’s noticeably slower than a traditional server. This is of course (non-sarcastically) exactly what I want. For admin tasks, it has plenty of power, and this trade-off means it has lower power consumption and heat production than a stock server. While debugging some puppet code that I was running takes longer than normal on this box, I was eventually able to get the job done. This is another reason why this box needs to act like more of an upstream distro — if it did, I’d be able to have a faster machine as my dev box!

Other tools:

Other stock tools like ethtool, and brctl, work out of the box. Bonding, vlan’s and every other feature I tested seems to work the same way you expect from a GNU/Linux system.

Puppet and automation:

Readers of my blog will know that I manage my servers with Puppet. Instead of having the puppet agent connect over an API to the switch, you can directly install and run puppet on this Cumulus Linux machine! Some users might quickly jump to using the firewall module as the solution for consistent management, but a level two user will know that a higher level wrapper around shorewall is the better approach. This is all possible with this switch and seems to work great! The downside was that I had to manually add repositories to get the shorewall packages because it is not a stock distro :(

Why not SDN?

SDN or software-defined networking, is a fantastic and interesting technology. Unfortunately, it’s a parallel problem to what I’m describing in this article, and not a solution to help you work around the lack of a good GNU+Linux switch. If programming the ASIC’s wasn’t an NDA requiring activity, I bet we’d see a lot more innovative networking companies and technologies pop up.

Future?

This product isn’t quite baked yet for me to want to use it in production, but it’s so tantalizingly close that it’s strongly worth considering. I hope that they react positively to my suggestions and create an even more native, upstream environment. Once this is done, it will be my go to, for all my switching!

Thanks:

Thanks very much to the Cumulus team for showing me their software, and giving me access to demo it on some live switches. I didn’t test performance, but I have no doubt that it competes with the market average. Prove me right by trying it out yourself!

Thanks for listening, and Happy hacking!

James

PS: Special thanks to David Caplan for the great networking discussions we had!

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Automatically deploying GlusterFS with Puppet-Gluster + Vagrant!

Puppet-Gluster was always about automating the deployment of GlusterFS. Getting your own Puppet server and the associated infrastructure running was never included “out of the box“. Today, it is! (This is big news!)

I’ve used Vagrant to automatically build these GlusterFS clusters. I’ve tested this with Fedora 20, and vagrant-libvirt. This won’t work with Fedora 19 because of bz#876541. I recommend first reading my earlier articles for Vagrant and Fedora:

Once you’re comfortable with the material in the above articles, we can continue…

The short answer:

$ sudo service nfs start
$ git clone --recursive https://github.com/purpleidea/puppet-gluster.git
$ cd puppet-gluster/vagrant/gluster/
$ vagrant up puppet && sudo -v && vagrant up

Once those commands finish, you should have four running gluster hosts, and a puppet server. The gluster hosts will still be building. You can log in and tail -F log files, or watch -n 1 gluster status commands.

The whole process including the one-time downloads took about 30 minutes. If you’ve got faster internet that I do, I’m sure you can cut that down to under 20. Building the gluster hosts themselves probably takes about 15 minutes.

Enjoy your new Gluster cluster!

Screenshots!

I took a few screenshots to make this more visual for you. I like to have virt-manager open so that I can visually see what’s going on:

The annex{1..4} machines are building in parallel.

The annex{1..4} machines are building in parallel. The valleys happened when the machines were waiting for the vagrant DHCP server (dnsmasq).

Here we can see two puppet runs happening on annex1 and annex4.

Notice the two peaks on the puppet server which correspond to the valleys on annex{1,4}.

Notice the two peaks on the puppet server which correspond to the valleys on annex{1,4}.

Here’s another example, with four hosts working in parallel:

foo

Can you answer why the annex machines have two peaks? Why are the second peaks bigger?

Tell me more!

Okay, let’s start with the command sequence shown above.

$ sudo service nfs start

This needs to be run once if the NFS server on your host is not already running. It is used to provide folder synchronization for the Vagrant guest machines. I offer more information about the NFS synchronization in an earlier article.

$ git clone --recursive https://github.com/purpleidea/puppet-gluster.git

This will pull down the Puppet-Gluster source, and all the necessary submodules.

$ cd puppet-gluster/vagrant/gluster/

The Puppet-Gluster source contains a vagrant subdirectory. I’ve included a gluster subdirectory inside it, so that your machines get a sensible prefix. In the future, this might not be necessary.

$ vagrant up puppet && sudo -v && vagrant up

This is where the fun stuff happens. You’ll need a base box image to run machines with Vagrant. Luckily, I’ve already built one for you, and it is generously hosted by the Gluster community.

The very first time you run this Vagrant command, it will download this image automatically, install it and then continue the build process. This initial box download and installation only happens once. Subsequent Puppet-Gluster+Vagrant deploys and re-deploys won’t need to re-download the base image!

This command starts by building the puppet server. Vagrant might use sudo to prompt you for root access. This is used to manage your /etc/exports file. After the puppet server is finished building, we refresh the sudo cache to avoid bug #2680.

The last vagrant up command starts up the remaining gluster hosts in parallel, and kicks off the initial puppet runs. As I mentioned above, the gluster hosts will still be building. Puppet automatically waits for the cluster to “settle” and enter a steady state (no host/brick changes) before it creates the first volume. You can log in and tail -F log files, or watch -n 1 gluster status commands.

At this point, your cluster is running and you can do whatever you want with it! Puppet-Gluster+Vagrant is meant to be easy. If this wasn’t easy, or you can think of a way to make this better, let me know!

I want N hosts, not 4:

By default, this will build four (4) gluster hosts. I’ve spent a lot of time writing a fancy Vagrantfile, to give you speed and configurability. If you’d like to set a different number of hosts, you’ll first need to destroy the hosts that you’ve built already:

$ vagrant destroy annex{1..4}

You don’t have to rebuild the puppet server because this command is clever and automatically cleans the old host entries from it! This makes re-deploying even faster!

Then, run the vagrant up command with the --gluster-count=<N> argument. Example:

$ vagrant up --gluster-count=8

This is also configurable in the puppet-gluster.yaml file which will appear in your vagrant working directory. Remember that before you change any configuration option, you should destroy the affected hosts first, otherwise vagrant can get confused about the current machine state.

I want to test a different GlusterFS version:

By default, this will use the packages from:

https://download.gluster.org/pub/gluster/glusterfs/LATEST/

but if you’d like to pick a specific GlusterFS version you can do so with the --gluster-version=<version> argument. Example:

$ vagrant up --gluster-version='3.4.2-1.el6'

This is also stored, and configurable in the puppet-gluster.yaml file.

Does (repeating) this consume a lot of bandwidth?

Not really, no. There is an initial download of about 450MB for the base image. You’ll only ever need to download this again if I publish an updated version.

Each deployment will hit a public mirror to download the necessary puppet, GlusterFS and keepalived packages. The puppet server caused about 115MB of package downloads, and each gluster host needed about 58MB.

The great thing about this setup, is that it is integrated with vagrant-cachier, so that you don’t have to re-download packages. When building the gluster hosts in parallel (the default), each host will have to download the necessary packages into a separate directory. If you’d like each host to share the same cache folder, and save yourself 58MB or so per machine, you’ll need to build in series. You can do this with:

$ vagrant up --no-parallel

I chose speed over preserving bandwidth, so I do not recommend this option. If your ISP has a bandwidth cap, you should find one that isn’t crippled.

Subsequent re-builds won’t download any packages that haven’t already been downloaded.

What should I look for?

Once the vagrant commands are done running, you’ll want to look at something to see how your machines are doing. I like to log in and run different commands. I usually log in like this:

$ vcssh --screen root@annex{1..4}

I explain how to do this kind of magic in an earlier post. I then run some of the following commands:

# tail -F /var/log/messages

This lets me see what the machine is doing. I can see puppet runs and other useful information fly by.

# ip a s eth2

This lets me check that the VIP is working correctly, and which machine it’s on. This should usually be the first machine.

# ps auxww | grep again.[py]

This lets me see if puppet has scheduled another puppet run. My scripts automatically do this when they decide that there is still building (deployment) left to do. If you see a python again.py process, this means it is sleeping and will wake up to continue shortly.

# gluster peer status

This lets me see which hosts have connected, and what state they’re in.

# gluster volume info

This lets me see if Puppet-Gluster has built me a volume yet. By default it builds one distributed volume named puppet.

I want to configure this differently!

Okay, you’re more than welcome to! All of the scripts can be customized. If you want to configure the volume(s) differently, you’ll want to look in the:

puppet-gluster/vagrant/gluster/puppet/manifests/site.pp

file. The gluster::simple class is well-documented, and can be configured however you like. If you want to do more serious hacking, have a look at the Vagrantfile, the source, and the submodules. Of course the GlusterFS source is a great place to hack too!

The network block, domain, and other parameters are all configurable inside of the Vagrantfile. I’ve tried to use sensible defaults where possible. I’m using example.com as the default domain. Yes, this will work fine on your private network. DNS is currently configured with the /etc/hosts file. I wrote some magic into the Vagrantfile so that the slow /etc/hosts shell provisioning only has to happen once per machine! If you have a better, functioning, alternative, please let me know!

What’s the greatest number of machines this will scale to?

Good question! I’d like to know too! I know that GlusterFS probably can’t scale to 1000 hosts yet. Keepalived can’t support more than 256 priorities, therefore Puppet-Gluster can’t scale beyond that count until a suitable fix can be found. There are likely some earlier limits inside of Puppet-Gluster due to maximum command line length constraints that you’ll hit. If you find any, let me know and I’ll patch them. Patches now cost around seven karma points. Other than those limits, there’s the limit of my hardware. Since this is all being virtualized on a lowly X201, my tests are limited. An upgrade would be awesome!

Can I use this to test QA releases, point releases and new GlusterFS versions?

Absolutely! That’s the idea. There are two caveats:

  1. Automatically testing QA releases isn’t supported until the QA packages have a sensible home on download.gluster.org or similar. This will need a change to:
    https://github.com/purpleidea/puppet-gluster/blob/master/manifests/repo.pp#L18

    The gluster community is working on this, and as soon as a solution is found, I’ll patch Puppet-Gluster to support it. If you want to disable automatic repository management (in gluster::simple) and manage this yourself with the vagrant shell provisioner, you’re able to do so now.

  2. It’s possible that new releases introduce bugs, or change things in a backwards incompatible way that breaks Puppet-Gluster. If this happens, please let me know so that something can get patched. That’s what testing is for!

You could probably use this infrastructure to test GlusterFS builds automatically, but that’s a project that would need real funding.

Updating the puppet source:

If you make a change to the puppet source, but you don’t want to rebuild the puppet virtual machine, you don’t have to. All you have to do is run:

$ vagrant provision puppet

This will update the puppet server with any changes made to the source tree at:

puppet-gluster/vagrant/gluster/puppet/

Keep in mind that the modules subdirectory contains all the necessary puppet submodules, and a clone of puppet-gluster itself. You’ll first need to run make inside of:

puppet-gluster/vagrant/gluster/puppet/modules/

to refresh the local clone. To see what’s going on, or to customize the process, you can look at the Makefile.

Client machines:

At the moment, this doesn’t build separate machines for gluster client use. You can either mount your gluster pool from the puppet server, another gluster server, or if you add the right DNS entries to your /etc/hosts, you can mount the volume on your host machine. If you really want Vagrant to build client machines, you’ll have to persuade me.

What about firewalls?

Normally I use shorewall to manage the firewall. It integrates well with Puppet-Gluster, and does a great job. For an unexplained reason, it seems to be blocking my VRRP (keepalived) traffic, and I had to disable it. I think this is due to a libvirt networking bug, but I can’t prove it yet. If you can help debug this issue, please let me know! To reproduce it, enable the firewall and shorewall directives in:

puppet-gluster/vagrant/gluster/puppet/manifests/site.pp

and then get keepalived to work.

Re-provisioning a machine after a long wait throws an error:

You might be hitting: vagrant-cachier #74. If you do, there is an available workaround.

Keepalived shows “invalid passwd!” messages in the logs:

This is expected. This happens because we build a distributed password for use with keepalived. Before the cluster state has settled, the password will be different from host to host. Only when the cluster is coherent will the password be identical everywhere, which incidentally is the only time when the VIP matters.

How did you build that awesome base image?

I used virt-builder, some scripts, and a clever Makefile. I’ll be publishing this code shortly. Hasn’t this been enough to keep you busy for a while?

Are you still here?

If you’ve read this far, then good for you! I’m sorry that it has been a long read, but I figured I would try to answer everyone’s questions in advance. I’d like to hear your comments! I get very little feedback, and I’ve never gotten a single tip! If you find this useful, please let me know.

Until then,

Happy hacking,

James

first release of puppet-shorewall

Oh, hi there.

In case you’re interested, I’ve just made a first release of my puppet-shorewall module. This isn’t meant as an exhaustive shorewall module, but it does provide most of the usual functionality that most users need.

In particular, it’s the module dependency that I use for many of my other puppet modules that provide firewalling. This is probably where you’re most likely to consume it.

In general most modules just implement shorewall::rule, so if you really don’t want to use this code, you can implement that signature yourself, or not use automatic firewalling. The shorewall::rule type has two main signatures, so have a look at the source, or a simple example if you want to get more familiar with the specifics. Using this module is highly recommended, specifically with puppet-gluster.

Please keep in mind that since I mostly use this module to open ports and to keep my other modules happy, I probably don’t have advanced traffic control features on my roadmap. If you’re looking for something that I haven’t added, contact me with the details and consider sponsoring some features.

Happy hacking,

James

Linuxcon day one, Monday

I’m here in New Orleans at Linux Con, hacking on puppet-gluster and talking to lots of interesting folks. I’ve met gluster hacker Theron Conrey, and my host John Mark Walker, Fedora and Raspberry Pi experts Spot and Ruth Suehle, and many others too.

The hotel is very nice. The bathroom sink has two taps of course, but both of them are hot. The New Orleans heat is probably the cause of this.

I’m hacking at full speed to get some new features and testing in before my talk on Thursday. I’ve been reworking the simple firewall support in my puppet module. For those that want automated and correct firewall configuration, expect some improvements soon.

I also pushed some work on property management for gluster volumes. This commit adds a list of all available gluster properties. The patch is still missing type information for many of them, because I haven’t yet tested each one, but if there are some you’d like to use, please let me know. This is easy to patch.

More code is landing soon. Don’t be afraid to contact me if you’re not sure how to get started with puppet gluster, or if there’s a use case that I am not currently solving.

Happy Hacking,

James

PS: Sorry I published this late!

Upgrading to centos 6.4 with shorewall onboard

In case you upgrade your CentOS 6.x box to version 6.4, the shorewall service might complain. With a scary message:

ERROR: Your kernel/iptables do not include state match support.
No version of Shorewall will run on this system

This is selinux at work, and the problem can easily be solved by running:

# restorecon -Rv /sbin

Thanks shorewall-users and

Happy hacking,

James