Live dmesg following

All good sysadmins eventually learn about using tail -F to tail files. Yes upper-case F is superior.

Around the time I wrote that article, I remember wanting to stream dmesg output too! The functionality wasn’t available without some sort of polling hack, but it turns out that kernel support for this actually landed around the same time in version 3.5.0!

Most GNU/Linux distros are probably running a new enough version by now, and you can now dmesg --follow (or dmesg -w):

$ dmesg -w
[1042958.877980] restoring control 00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000101/10/5
[1042959.254826] usb 1-1.2: reset low-speed USB device number 3 using ehci-pci
[1042959.356847] psmouse serio1: synaptics: queried max coordinates: x [..5472], y [..4448]
[1042959.530884] PM: resume of devices complete after 976.885 msecs
[1042959.531457] PM: Finishing wakeup.
[1042959.531460] Restarting tasks ... done.
[1042959.622234] video LNXVIDEO:00: Restoring backlight state
[1042959.767952] e1000e: enp0s25 NIC Link is Down
[1042959.771333] IPv6: ADDRCONF(NETDEV_UP): enp0s25: link is not ready
[1048528.391506] All your base are belong to us.

As an added bonus, you can access this via journalctl --dmesg --follow too:

$ journalctl -kf
[snip]
Aug 28 19:58:13 hostname unknown: All your base are belong to us.
Now we have a dmesg version too! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fvTxv46ano&html5=1

Now we have a dmesg version too!

Since my dmesg output wasn’t very noisy when writing this article, and since I didn’t write an “all your base” kernel module, you can actually test this functionality by writing to the kernel ring buffer:

$ sudo bash -c 'echo The Technical Blog of James is awesome! > /dev/kmsg'

Happy hacking!

James

PS: Since this is a facility that provides events, we could eventually write an mgmt config “fact” or resource around it!

continuous display of log files (better tail -f)

All good sysadmins know about using tail -f to follow a log file. I use this all the time to follow /var/log/messages and my gluster logs in particular. Maybe everyone already knows this, but it deserves a PSA: after a certain amount of time (~days) it seems that new messages don’t appear!

What happens by default is that tail -f follows the file descriptor, not the file name, so when your log files get rotated, the file descriptor still points to the (now renamed) file which no longer gets updates any more.

The solution is to get tail to follow the file name you’re interested in:

tail --follow=name /var/log/messages

EDIT: Fortunately there is a shorter way of running this too, you can use:

tail -F

on any up to date version of tail to get the same result. This adds in –retry to the –folllow=name argument.

Happy hacking!

James